Carers of eating disorder patients face dual challenge _ they need care too

PrintCaring for somebody who has a mental illness is challenging, exhausting, worrying and life changing in equal measures; but when you care for a loved one suffering an eating disorder you must rise to the dual challenges of meeting the physical and emotional needs of a sick loved one.
Louise Sezgin of Plymouth Eating Disorders Support Group, UK, writes:

Support for carers is probably even more poorly provided than it is for those seeking care and treatment. This is alarming as carers are the most important asset in supporting and encouraging loved ones in their recovery and in actually providing their practical day to day care while ensuring their safety.
Caring for somebody with a life threatening illness causes immense emotional distress, can place strain on other relationships and often causes difficulties with work and finances.
Peer Support Groups
Peer support groups can be lifelines for carers as those attending are able to acknowledge the commonality of thoughts, feelings and frustrations while sharing coping strategies and successes with one another.

World Eating Disorders Action Day June 2, 2016 is an important opportunity to raise awareness of the enormity of the issues faced not only by those suffering an eating disorder but the impact of these deadly illnesses on families and friends.

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Join Louise and Plymouth Eating Disorders Support Group in supporting World Eating Disorders Action Day

Be sure to follow along on twitter @WorldEDDay and hashtag #WeDoAct, #WorldEDActionDay, @WorldEatingDisordersAction on Instagram andWorld Eating Disorders Action Day on Facebook.

About June Alexander

As founder of The Diary Healer my prime motivation is to connect with people who have experienced an eating disorder, trauma or other mental health challenge, and provide inspiration through the narrative, to live a full and meaningful life. My nine books about eating disorders focus on learning through story-sharing. Prior to writing books, which include my memoir, I had a long career in print journalism. In 2017, I graduated as a Doctor of Philosophy (Creative Writing), researching the usefulness of journaling and writing when recovering from an eating disorder or other traumatic experience.
Today I combine my writing expertise with life experience to help others self-heal. Clients receive mentoring in narrative techniques and guidance in memoir-writing. I also share my editing expertise with people who are writing their story and wish to prepare it to publication standard. I encourage everyone to write their story. Your story counts!
Contact me: Email june@junealexander.com and on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn.

All articles by June Alexander

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